Luxman L30 Price

Posted : admin On 1/25/2022

Love The Luxman amps and this is no exeption. Really smooth and detaild sounding amp with a LOT of power. It has a really good phono stsge both mm/mc with the ability to bypass the preamp section and go phono straight. Lots of other futures to play around with as well. I've got the Luxman hooked up with a pair of JBL l19=superb match. Luxman L-30 Specifications. Power output: 40 watts per channel into 8Ω (stereo) Frequency response: 15Hz to 50kHz. Total harmonic distortion: 0.05%. Damping factor: 90. Input sensitivity: 2.5mV (MM), 150mV (line) Signal to noise ratio: 64dB (MM), 83dB (line) Semiconductors: 27 x transistors, 8 x diodes, 2 x zener diodes, 1 x led.

VACUUM TUBE AMPLIFIERS

LX-380

Capturing the era of the ‘38’ – the aspiration of a new vacuum tube amplifier

The LX-380 represents a new era in golden ‘38’ series vacuum tube integrated amplifiers from LUXMAN. Providing an exceptionally deep resonance of sound sources of various ages and genres, the LX-380 combines LECUA* - a computerized attenuator which carefully reproduces the dynamism of each performance - with a power amplifier circuit that expresses the rich musicality of the 6L6GC output tube. Housed in a wooden case that is reminiscent of the 28 series, the LX-380 appeals to a new generation with a winning combination of cutting edge technology and traditional know-how. *LECUA is an abbreviation of Luxman Electric Controlled Ultimate Attenuator. Luxman L30 Price

Vacuum tube 6L6G output configuration

The LX-380 is equipped with the 6L6GC beam power tube that has a reputation for high quality, stability and a delicate, soft tonal quality. The rated output of 20W+20W that is sufficient for a domestic sound system is achieved through the combination of a powerful, flexible Mullard type driver stage with a push pull structure final stage. This adopts a fixed bias type to maintain a constant grid voltage. The auditory drive force that is created by a vacuum tube amplifier is not easily quantified. This and a dense, mellow tonal quality have been achieved comfortably in the design of the LX-380 not with a high-power specification but by building in a margin in the vacuum tube and peripherals. The combination of experience and original design knowledge results in longevity of enjoyment of this product with long term peace of mind.

Classical knob layout and wooden case

The elegant exterior in a natural veneer finish in a full sized (440mm) square wooden case is reminiscent of the original classic layout that consists of a combination of knob and lever switches made of machined aluminium and resin.

L30

The first ever vacuum tube amplifier to feature LECUA

The LX-380 is the first vacuum tube amplifier to feature LECUA, the proprietary computerized control attenuator from LUXMAN that enables the sound to be adjusted smoothly with minimal deterioration using an 88-step method. The LX-380 uses the same high sound quality semiconductor circuit that has been successfully proven in integrated amplifiers such as the L-590AX.

Expandability options

The LX-380 is equipped with an electronically controlled tone control function (bass/treble) for delicate adjustments to the tonal quality per the sound source and listening environment, with 3 selectable turnover frequency positions. The loudness mode interlocks with the sound volume to enable the correction of bass and treble ranges depending on human hearing characteristics.

Fully fledged phono amplifier circuit

Due to their profound sound quality, analog records are now becoming popular again and the LX-380 is therefore equipped with a high sound quality semiconductor structured phono amplifier circuit that is compatible with MM/MC types. This circuit derives from the concept of the LUXMAN integrated amplifier and allows users to enjoy genuine analog record playback without adding an extra dedicated phono amplifier. A subsonic switch is provided on the front panel to suppress any woofer fluctuation that is caused by low frequency signals from warped records as well as a monaural switch to activate L channel or R channel with the same signal at monaural record playback. Such detailed design and functionality enable the full enjoyment of analog playback.

Future proof separate amplifier structure

The pre/main amplifier circuits can be separated by a switch enabling the bi-amplifier structure in which a power amplifier can be added and the surround sound environment enhanced using an AV amplifier. The LX-380 is designed so that it can be expanded as part of a system for future upgrades and has a headphone output for private sound enjoyment.

Large speaker terminals for 2 systems

The rear panel of the LX-380 is equipped with 18mm pitch gold plated RCA terminals to support high grade line cables with large plugs and speaker terminals (2 lines) in inline layout, and are compatible with Y lugs to connect easily with extra thick speaker cables.

Longevity of design

The LX-380 has been designed to be durable with sufficient margin built in for operating voltage and heat radiation from the vacuum tube.

Rated output20W + 20W (6Ω), 18W + 18W (8Ω), 14W + 14W (4Ω)
Input sensitivity/input impedance (PRE OUT :1V)PHONO (MM): 3.0mV/47kΩ
PHONO (MC): 0.38mV/100Ω
LINE: 180mV/47kΩ, MAIN-IN: 690mV/100kΩ
Output voltageRECOUT: 180mV, PRE OUT: 1V
Frequency responsePHONO: 20Hz to 20kHz (±0.5dB)
LINE: 20Hz to 80kHz (+0, -3.0dB)
Total harmonic distortion1% or less (6Ω, 1kHz)
S/N ratio (IHF-A) PHONO (MM): 84dB or more
PHONO (MC): 67dB or more
LINE: 95dB or more
Volume adjustmentLECUA
CircuitDriver: Mullard, Output: beam tetrode connection
Vacuum tubes6L6GC×4, ECC82×3
Output configuration Push-pull
Max. amount of tone control ±8dB, turnover frequency switch-over system
BASS: 150 / 300 / 600Hz, TREBLE: 1.5k / 3k / 6kHz
Power supply230V~(50Hz) / 115V~(60Hz)
Power consumption 127W
External dimensions 440(W) x 197(H) x 403(D) mm
front side knob of 25mm and rear side terminal
of 28mm included in depth
Net weight17.6kg (main unit)
AccessoriesRemote controller (RA-25)
Power cable
Speaker terminal Supported Y-lug terminal dimensionWidth of part a: 15mm or less
Width of part b: 8mm or more
* Connection may not be performed
depending on the shape of the
Y-lug terminal.
Rated output
20W + 20W (6Ω), 18W + 18W (8Ω), 14W + 14W (4Ω)
Input sensitivity/input impedance (PRE OUT :1V)
PHONO (MM): 3.0mV/47kΩ
PHONO (MC): 0.38mV/100Ω
LINE: 180mV/47kΩ, MAIN-IN: 690mV/100kΩ
Output voltage
RECOUT: 180mV, PRE OUT: 1V
Frequency response
PHONO: 20Hz to 20kHz (±0.5dB)
LINE: 20Hz to 80kHz (+0, -3.0dB)
Total harmonic distortion
1% or less (6Ω, 1kHz)
S/N ratio (IHF-A)
PHONO (MM): 84dB or more
PHONO (MC): 67dB or more
LINE: 95dB or more
Volume adjustment
LECUA
Circuit
Driver: Mullard, Output: beam tetrode connection
Vacuum tubes
6L6GC×4, ECC82×3
Output configuration
Push-pull
Max. amount of tone control
±8dB, turnover frequency switch-over system
BASS: 150 / 300 / 600Hz, TREBLE: 1.5k / 3k / 6kHz
Power supply
230V~(50Hz) / 115V~(60Hz)
Power consumption
127W
External dimensions
440(W) x 197(H) x 403(D) mm
front side knob of 25mm and rear side terminal
of 28mm included in depth
Net weight
17.6kg (main unit)
Accessories
Remote controller (RA-25)
Power cable
Speaker terminal Supported Y-lug terminal dimension
Width of part a: 15mm or less
Width of part b: 8mm or more
* Connection may not be performed
depending on the shape of the
Y-lug terminal.
Luxman l30 price chartMy uncle asked me if I could repair his Luxman L-30 stereo amplifier, circa 1976-78. I said I could, so I did!
The L-30 is a 2x35W integrated amp made by Lux corporation in Japan. The company is still around, making hifi products.
When Uncle Pete brought over his amp, it was dirty from sitting around, unused, for many years. One of the knobs had come apart. Turning the knobs while the unit was powered on produced some awful scratching noises, and the knobs were stiff and difficult to manipulate.
I took the amp apart for the first time and cleaned the potentiometers with DeoxIT, a miracle contact cleaner. After turning each knob back and forth about a hundred times, the crackling was eliminated. I also blew out a cubic foot of dust and made some observations about the electronic guts.

Many of the original electrolytic capacitors had leaked their electrolyte gunk (see the big black one in the image below).
I found a great resource on repairing this exact amplifier. The author advised to check the small signal transistors for a 'silver oxide creeping disease'. The problem was that in the 70s, Hitachi 'tinned' the leads of many transistors with silver (instead of tin). Silver oxidises over time, and the rust creeps up the legs of the transistors and eventually rots the guts.
It's hard to tell that the leads of the smaller transistor (installed back-to-back with a larger one) has blackened legs, not silvery/metallic like the other components.

I found some great supporting resources:
  • Luxman L-30 Service Manual - circuit schematic, parts list, circuit board layout diagrams, and re-calibration info. Absolutely critical!
  • Hans Hilberink's Luxman Vintage Audio Website, specifically this page about the L-30.
  • Vintage Audio Repair L-30 - Dutch website with great before-and-after pictures of an L-30 rebuild.
  • Replace 42 electrolytic capacitors, same specs as originals. I am not savvy enough with analog circuits to contemplate upgrades;
  • Replace 17 small transistors (TO-92 package);
  • Replace the factory speaker terminals with newer, nicer binding posts with banana plug connectors;
  • Do a nice cosmetic cleanup of the knobs and faceplate.
What I did, and what I learned.
I spec'd and ordered all my parts from Digikey. My parts list is here on Google Sheets. I ordered Nichicon brand capacitors (UKA, USW and UKT series) and ON Semiconductor transistors. For the capacitors, if I couldn't find an exact replacement, I spec'd the same capacitance at the next-highest voltage rating.
I splurged and bought wire labels for disassembly. This was probably the best idea I had for the entire project. The kit of professional wire labels kept me organized and made re-assembly a cinch. (the link to the kit is in my parts spreadsheet, linked above).
Mistake #1: Instead of desoldering the wired pins from the circuit board, I desoldered the wires from the pins, instead of the pins from the board. This made reassembly WAY harder than it needed to be! In fact, to reassemble, I desoldered the pins from the board, soldered the pins to the wires, then soldered the pins back into the board. I doubled my work for no reason.
Top: Desoldered pins from wires. Mistake! Bottom: Pins soldered to wires, with nice labels.
First up for replacement were the capacitors. They were simple to replace because the polarity is printed on the circuit boards.
Another great purchase for this project was a solder-sucker. Previously I'd only used desoldering braid (copper braid that absorbs solder when heated). A solder-sucker makes it SO EASY to remove components - suck off most of the solder with a puff of air, then remove the tiny remaining bit with braid. The sucker I got is on my parts list too.
Top: New capacitors in blue (bigger ones) and gold (smaller ones). Bottom: Original PB-1009 circuit board.
Next up were the transistors. They are trickier than capacitors:
  1. They have three leads (leads);
  2. The pin-out of the new transistors (Emitter-Base-Collector) is different from the old (Emitter-Collector-Base), and;
  3. They must be installed correctly or else they won't function as intended! Funny things will happen.
Top: PB-1008 with new capacitors (blue, gold) and transistors (black). Bottom: Original circuit board.
The last upgrade was replacing the old wind-only speaker binding posts with modern banana jacks, where you can wind or insert your bare speaker wire, or plug in a cable with a banana plug.
Top: New binding posts. Bottom: Original speaker terminals.
Next up: testing and reassembly.
I carefully reconnected the pins and wires to the two main circuit boards and arranged them back in the case. I followed the instructions in the service manual to do the 2-step calibration. Step One was an 'Idle [current] adjust'; you remove a pair of fuses and measure the current between two terminals. If, after a minute of power-on time you're reading 45mA, you're good to go. I was fine. A good start!
Mistake #2: The second step is to check the 'Zero DC [voltage] offset'. You want the reading across each channel's speaker terminals within +/- 50mV (millivolts). I measured the right channel at about 25mV. I measured the left channel at 33V - over 600 times what I expected!
Disappointed, I pulled everything apart and started hunting for mistakes. I knew it was going to be a transistor installed incorrectly because one channel was good, one bad, and capacitors don't amplify voltages. After a few minutes of searching, and double- and triple-checking my work, I found one transistor (Q202a) installed incorrectly.
Lesson learned: the calibration procedure was critical. If I had just plugged it into my speakers to test, I'd be shopping for a new pair of speakers.
Work bench during one disassembly.

Excited, I put everything back together for final testing. Both calibration checks checked out. All good. It's time to fire this baby up!
I assembled the amp and took it inside. I powered it on. I queued up a record, dropped the needle, and....
Nothing.
Not a sound came out of the speakers. I turned up the sound just a bit. I heard something - so I maxed it. Terrible, choppy, intermittent sound. I could hear all the loud bits but the quiet parts of the song just dropped off. Stuttery.
My heart fell - I really thought it was going to work. I had no idea what the problem might be. Disappointed, I went back to the garage for disassembly #3.
Mistake #3: Since the problem was present on both channels, I reasoned that I had a serious issue with parts/components. I printed out 7 transistor data sheets (4 old types, 3 new) and started comparing specs.
After a few minutes of comparing data sheets I realized that I did something so dumb that I had to quadruple-check to be sure. Everywhere I wanted to install a BC550 transistor, I'd installed a BC560, and vice-versa.
How did I manage something like this? I looked at my parts list, and from Day 1 I'd spec'd the wrong transistors.
I figured it out later that day. Looking at Hilberink's website again, he says:
The 2SA836 and 2SC1345 made by Hitachi will sooner or later add a lot of noise and even storm and thunder to your RIAA amp. [...]
Replace with modern BC550C/BC560C and all noise problems are history.
I read these two sentences, and without even thinking to double check, noted to replace 2SA836 units with BC550, and to replace 2SC1345 units with BC560. In fact, it should have been the other way around (2SA836->BC560, both PNP type, and 2SC1345->BC550, both NPN type). This was totally my error - rushing, misunderstanding, and not double checking. I only had to replace 11 transistors and I'd be all set.
One more set of calibrations as a sanity-check, then I assembled the L-30 for the last time. I'd cleaned and polished the faceplate and all the knobs. The volume knob, which had fallen apart, was securely glued back together.
I plugged the unit it and dropped in an Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong album that I found in my parents' collection. I don't have the musical vocabulary to describe it as anything other than AMAZING. Superb warm sound.
That warm sound... get it?

Luxman L30 Price Target

That was Sunday night, and over the next few nights I listened to all kinds of stuff. It's hard to explain how the Luxman L-30 drives my KEF LS50 speakers in a totally different way than my NAD 3020 (rebuilt 2 years ago, and going strong). I was in love.
My Uncle Pete came over tonight to pick it up, and I think he was blown away. He brought over a record (I don't recall which one!) and we listened to most of the A side. Then we listened to tracks from The Sword, The Rolling Stones, Yngwie Malmsteen, Tony Bird, Eternal Champion, Iron Maiden, and Buffalo Springfield.
He was excited to be leaving with it, and I was sad to see it go! This was an exceptionally fun project, and challenging because I make some mistakes along the way. That's OK because I learned more than I would have otherwise.
What's next?

Luxman L30 Price List


Full album/gallery.